News Tidbits For March 23, 2018

Workout of the Day

Brazilian Scenario

by Peter Walker | News Tidbits for March 22, 2018

Source: Globo

World Scenario

by Peter Walker | News Tidbits for March 22, 2018

Source: The New York Times

→ Travel was in a chaos, schools were closed and tens of thousands of people took to the streets across France on Thursday as railway workers, teachers, students and air traffic controllers went on strike to protest President Emmanuel Macron’s economic and social reforms. Mr. Macron is trying to overhaul France’s rail system and looks to change unemployment benefits and the pension system.

→ Mark Zuckerberg, the chief Facebook executive, gave an unexpected interview to the New York Times yesterday. Although he promised to fix the system, not everyone was impressed by his statements. “He avoided the big issue, which is that for many years, Facebook was basically giving away user data like it was handing out candy,” said one analyst.

Economic Scenario

by Peter Walker | News Tidbits for March 22, 2018

Source: The New York Times

→ China has reacted to Mr. Trump’s announced plans to impose $60 billion worth of annual tariffs on Chinese imports by proposing reciprocal tariffs on $3 billion of American-made imports, and said that it would also pursue legal action against the U.S. at the World Trade Organization. In  the U.S., markets plunged on fears of a trade war.

→ The Trump Administration said it would exempt the European Union and other allies from stiff steel and aluminum tariffs that go into effect today, but may impose import quotas to prevent too much foreign metal from flooding into the United States. According to one source, Brazilian steel is on the list of exemptions.

It's O.K.

by Peter Walker | News Tidbits for March 22, 2018

Source: The New York Times

 

O.K. is a shortcut used the world over — and even beyond, having been uttered at least once during a space mission.

On this day in 1839, The Boston Morning Post published “O.K.” for the first known time, using the abbreviation next to the words “all correct.”

There have been many theories about its origin, but the most likely is that O.K. was an abbreviation for the deliberately and playfully misspelled “orl korrect” (all correct), and the expression gained prominence in the mid-19th century.

Today, O.K. is an Americanism adopted by virtually every language, and one of the first words spoken on the moon.

Vocabulary Study

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